Carlisle

Borough

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Background Information

No names known for 1510-23

Elections

DateCandidate
1529EDWARD AGLIONBY I
 JOHN COLDALE
1536(not known)
1539(not known)
1542WILLIAM STAPLETON
 (not known)
1545HUGH AGLIONBY
 ROBERT SMITH
1547EDWARD AGLIONBY I
 THOMAS DALSTON
by 23 Jan. 1552EDWARD AGLIONBY II vice Dalston, deceased1
1553 (Mar.)EDWARD AGLIONBY II
 JOHN DUDLEY
1553 (Oct.)JOHN AGLIONBY
 SIMON BRISCO
1554 (Apr.)ROBERT WHEATLEY
 RICHARD MYNSHO
1554 (Nov.)ROBERT WHEATLEY
 RICHARD MYNSHO
1555WILLIAM MIDDLETON
 WILLIAM WARD
1558RICHARD ASSHETON
 ROBERT DALTON

Main Article

Carlisle was the military and administrative centre of the west marches and the seat of a bishopric. Leading military engineers were consulted when Henry VIII undertook to re-fortify the city and its eastern counterpart Berwick-upon-Tweed. The area within the walls was largely unoccupied and derelict, and although the city provided a local market its economy rested on the furnishing of the garrison and of the forces assembled there from time to time. The dissolution of the Augustinian priory and the two friaries deprived the citizens of a minor source of income. Henry II’s charter had been amplified during the later middle ages and was so again in 1510 and 1547. The fee-farm was fixed at £40 in 1461. Civic government was by a mayor assisted by 11 other ‘worshipful persons’, the council known as the Twenty-Four and several officers, but no records survive for the period. Effective power rested with the warden of the west marches, often in residence at the castle, and with the military commanders periodically sent north. The wardenship was held at different times during the period by the 2nd and 3rd Bar