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News and Events

See below for our latest news, events and publications.

You can also:

- Follow the History on Twitter (@HistParl) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/HistoryOfParliament)

- Follow our 1832-68 ‘Victorian Commons’ section on Twitter (@TheVictCommons)

- Read our History of Parliament blog, the Victorian Commons blog and our Director’s blog.

- See the current programme of our 'Parliaments, Politics and People' Seminar at the Institute of Historical Research

Over 50 years on from the passing of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act in England and Wales, join this free online event delivered in partnership between the History of Parliament Trust and Dr Justin Bengry, Director of Goldsmiths' Centre for Queer History, to explore the implications of the Act and how it impacted the lives of those affected by it.

Hear from Professor Matt Cook who will discuss what the 1967 Sexual Offences Act meant for the queer community at the time; why it was seen as an irrelevance for some but a blessing by others, and how it led to an increase in prosecutions.

Dr Justin Bengry will be joined by panellists Gregan Crawford and Dr Jane Traies to discuss the restrictions, fears and attitudes felt in the aftermath of the Act and to explore comparisons between those who were directly impacted by it, with those who lived outside of its jurisdiction.

The event is 60 minutes and the last 15 minutes will be available for you to ask questions.

Sign up here.

Speakers

Justin Bengry
Justin Bengry is Director of the Centre for Queer History at Goldsmiths, University of London where he also convenes the world's first MA in Queer History. He is a cultural historian specialising in histories of sexualities with particular interests in capitalism, local history, family history and policy surrounding the so-called 'gay pardon'. He is currently part of an international partnership researching LGBTQ+ experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic and is completing a book on the history of the pink pound.

Matt Cook
Matt Cook is Professor of Modern History at Birkbeck, University of London and a cultural historian specializing in the history of sexuality and the history of London in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has a background in literary and cultural theory and strong interests in cross-disciplinary work and queer, public and community history. He is an editor of History Workshop Journal, sits on the steering committee of the Birkbeck Institute of Gender and Sexuality (BIGS), and was director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre (2009 - 2018).

Gregan Crawford
Gregan Crawford came out in Scotland in 1972 and made contact with the Scottish Minorities Group (SMG). The SMG campaigned for the reform of the law on homosexual offences in Scotland, which was not under the jurisdiction of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act. Alongside other members of the group Gregan lobbied MPs, campaigned and raised funds to aid the campaign for law reform; this included his management of regular licensed gay discos in the mid-seventies. Gregan is now a retired a telecommunications engineer and is heavily involved in local politics.

Jane Traies
Dr Jane Traies is a writer, researcher and storyteller who uses oral history methods to bring to light the experiences of marginalised lesbian and bisexual women. She is the author of The Lives of Older Lesbians (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) and Now You See Me: lesbian life stories (Tollington Press, 2018). Her most recent book, Free To Be Me (Tollington Press, 2021) features the experiences of lesbian asylum-seekers in the UK. Jane and some of her interviewees have appeared in the short films Now You See Me (Esme Waldron, 2016) and Older Than What? (Steen Starr, 2017).

This is an online event and will be hosted on Microsoft Teams which you can access through web browsers like Chrome, Firefox or Microsoft Edge. Safari is not currently supported. You do not need a Microsoft account to join the event. We will send full details of how to join the event online following registration.

Sign up here.

Please contact Sammy Sturgess with any questions.

30 September 2021 marks the 250th anniversary of the opening of Bath’s magnificent Assembly Rooms. As the queen of the eighteenth century spas, Bath’s healing waters attracted far more than the seriously ill and the worried well: the town offered the visiting Company luxury, culture, diversion and pleasure. This two-day virtual conference, which will take place on Zoom, takes, as a starting point, the plans for, and the establishment of, the (new) Assembly Rooms and then expands to explore an exciting array of papers by a group of international scholars. Topics include coffee-houses and chocolate-houses, chairmen and undertakers, famous musicians and celebrity politicians, lodging-house keepers and the visiting beau monde, the religion of Wilberforce and the satire of Austen — and far more.

 

The conference is free, but attendees are asked to register via the link below and obtain a ticket.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/165881168039

Zoom links for the sessions will be supplied closer to the date of the conference.

 

Separate Registration via Eventbrite will follow for linked evening event on 30 Sept. in the Bath Assembly Rooms to commemorate the opening of the rooms on 30 Sept. 1771. The evening’s entertainment will comprise a Public Lecture, a Historical Introduction to the 1771 RIDOTTO, 18th century dance displays, & a drinks reception.

Note: There will be a registration fee for the in-person event.

 

Download the Bath 250 Programme and Bath 250 Abstracts.
 
Conference organisers: Hillary Burlock (QMUL), Elaine Chalus (University of Liverpool), Oliver Cox (TORCH, Oxford), Robin Eagles (History of Parliament), Rupert Goulding (National Trust)

30 September 2021 marks the 250th anniversary of the completion and opening of Bath’s magnificent Assembly Rooms.

To mark the anniversary is a high-profile event involving as many key figures working on Bath’s history and heritage, with the Assembly Rooms as the focus.

The conference will likely have a hybrid format.

29 September will be hosted virtually. Covid permitting, 30 September 2021 will be held in the Assembly Rooms itself, featuring performances of eighteenth-century dance and music.

If necessary, we intend to switch to a virtual platform for the entire event.

Interested scholars are invited to submit abstracts of no more than 250 words by 14 June 2021.

We are seeking papers that relate to themes relevant to the Assembly Rooms and/or Bath and its environs in the Georgian period (e.g., music, dance, performance, fashion, food, medicine, as well as Bath’s economic, social and political history and its national and international connections). We welcome submissions from all scholars, but particularly encourage Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers.

Please submit abstracts and any questions via email to Elaine Chalus (e.h.chalus@liverpool.ac.uk).

On 1 June 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Hannes Kleineke (History of Parliament). Hannes will be answering questions on his paper ‘Parliamentary Elections in the reign of Henry VI Revisited – Some New Perspectives on an Old Subject?’. Hannes will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Hannes’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Hannes’s paper in PDF format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 1 June 2021. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

On 18 May 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Sonny Angus (Edinburgh University). Sonny will be answering questions on his paper ‘Portraits, Plates and Pigs: Representations of National Leaders Within the Material Culture of Scottish Radical Procession 1832-1884’. Sonny will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Sonny’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Sonny’s paper in PDF format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 18 May 2021. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

We’re delighted to announce that Dr Stephen Roberts FSA FRHistS FLSW, Director Emeritus of History of Parliament Trust, is among the new entrants to the Learned Society of Wales’ Fellowship. 

 

He joins 44 other new Fellows, all of whom share a link with Wales, its universities or intellectual life and are drawn from all specialisms. 

A full list of the new Fellows can be downloaded hereThey demonstrate the ongoing excellence of Welsh research, universities and intellectual life, all of which have shone during the extraordinary events of this pandemic-marked year. 

The new Fellows include academics from Welsh, UK and overseas higher education institutions as well as individuals who a play a significant role in Welsh public life. Specialisms range from nanotechnology to jazz, parliamentary history to tumour biology and much in between. 

The Society’s President, Professor Hywel Thomas, said of the new intake: 

"I am delighted to welcome our new Fellows to the Learned Society of Wales. This past, extraordinary, year has shown the value of world-class research. There is a thirst for knowledge and expertise, in all fields, as we try to recover from the challenges of the pandemic. Our Fellows are at the forefront of that knowledge and expertise.

 “We have also elected a higher percentage of women Fellows than ever before, with 38%. There is more we need to do but I am also pleased we are making progress on our efforts to make the Society better reflect the diversity of Welsh life.”

Election to the Fellowship is public recognition of excellence and takes place following a rigorous examination of each nominee’s achievements in their relevant field. 

The Society’s Fellowship now numbers 595. Their combined expertise allows the Society to strengthen its contribution to Welsh public life, through its contributions to government policy development, public lectures and seminars and its expanding Wales Studies programme. 

The new Fellows will be formally admitted at the Society’s AGM which will be held on 19th May. 

THE HISTORY OF PARLIAMENT  DISSERTATION COMPETITION 2021

The History of Parliament Trust will award a prize of £250 to the best undergraduate dissertation presented in 2021 on a subject relating to British or Irish parliamentary or political history.

Each university History department is invited to enter one dissertation.

They should send a digital copy of the entry to Sammy Sturgess at ssturgess@histparl.ac.uk together with a completed entry form (see below), and an unbound copy of the dissertation to ‘History of Parliament Dissertation competition, 18 Bloomsbury Square, London WC1A 2NS’. Copies will not be returned.

The closing date for receipt of entries is 30 September 2021.

Parliamentary History has agreed to consider publication in the Journal for the winning dissertation.

The decision to publish or not will be at the discretion of the editor of Parliamentary History. They may ask for appropriate amendments if necessary. 

For any queries, please contact: ssturgess@histparl.ac.uk.

 For details about the History of Parliament Trust, please see our website, www.historyofparliamentonline.org.

Click here to download entry form.

The History of Parliament is running its essay competition for Sixth Form students during the summer term.

Entries are encouraged from Year 11, 12 and 13 students and the winner will receive £100.

The prize will be awarded for the best essay on a subject of the candidate's own choice related to the parliamentary or political history of Britain and Ireland.

The closing date for this competition is 30 July 2021.

Competition rules: 
The competition is open to any student at a UK school or college, preparing to study or currently studying for A levels (years 11, 12 and 13).

Essays must be submitted by a school, and no school should submit more than four essays.

Essays should be of no less than 2000 words and not more than 4000 words. Essays should be typed.

Entries should be sent to our Public Engagement Assistant, Connie Jeffery at cjeffery@histparl.ac.uk

Please send one email per individual entry.

Entries must be received by 30 July 2021.

Judging will be by a panel appointed by the History of Parliament.  Their decision will be final, and no correspondence can be entered into.

There will be one winner, although the judges may make special commendations if they think fit.

Although candidates with essays covering the period before 1832 are encouraged to use the material on the History of Parliament’s website, it's not mandatory.

Students may also find the History of Parliament blog to assist them.

Please enclose the following details with each entry:
The candidate’s name

The candidate’s school and its address, with an email contact for the school, and email contact for the candidate, if they wish to be contacted personally.

The candidate’s age at 30 July 2021

A declaration signed by the teacher saying that the work is all the candidate’s own.

(We regret that entries cannot be individually acknowledged, and will not be returned after the competition.)

 For any queries, please contact us at cjeffery@histparl.ac.uk

'Decided on by men': oral histories from women MPs 

The Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art presents its 8th Annual International Women’s Day Lecture on Wednesday 17 March at 6pm via Microsoft Teams Live

Following an extended introduction by Diane Abbott MP, join Dr Emma Peplow and Dr Priscila Pivatto, from the History of Parliament Trust, as they discuss the women MPs who found themselves in 'a place decided on by men, for men'. 

Using interviews with 32 female MPs of different parties and backgrounds who sat between 1966 and 2001, this 75-minute event, will explore women's responses to parliament's masculine culture, and how they were able to pursue their political careers and interests in this environment. 

The History of Parliament Trust researches parliamentary politics, and parliamentarians, back to parliament's origins in the 13th century. In 2011 it began an Oral History Project, in collaboration with the British Library, interviewing former MPs about their lives and experiences. In August 2020 an introduction to the archive, The Political Lives of Postwar British MPs was published by the speakers.

 Dr Emma Peplow is Head of Development at the History of Parliament Trust and is currently responsible for the Oral History Project. 

 Dr Priscila Pivatto is Research Associate at the History of Parliament Trust and since 2011 has coordinated the Oral History Project. 

Book a free ticket here.

On 16 March 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Martin Spychal (History of Parliament). Martin will be answering questions on his paper ‘The geography of voting behaviour: towards a roll-call analysis of England’s reformed electoral map, 1832-68’. Martin will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Martin’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Martin’s paper in PDF format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 16 March 2020. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

 

 

The History of Parliament is delighted to announce the publication of its latest volumes, the House of Lords, 1604-1629, edited by Andrew Thrush.

Based on detailed manuscript research in 120 archives, and containing over 280 biographies and a ground-breaking Institutional Survey, these volumes provide an unrivalled study of the early Stuart upper House.

The new volumes will be the second set in the History of Parliament’s study of the House of Lords, and their fourteenth published project.

 

For sales please refer to the publication page via our publisher, Cambridge University Press, here.

For media and general inquiries please contact website@histparl.ac.uk. 

On 2 March 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Max Skjönsberg (University of Liverpool). Max will be discussing his new book The Persistence of Party: Ideas of Harmonious Discord in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Cambridge, 2021). Max will provide a brief summary of his book before a question and answer session. You can access the introduction of Max’s book via the links below. The seminar will be guest chaired by Professor David Hayton (Queen’s University, Belfast).

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Max’s paper in PDF format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 2 March 2020. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

On 16 February 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Matt Raven (University of Nottingham). Matt will be answering questions on his paper ‘Parliament and Trial by the ‘Peers of the Land’ in Henry of Lancaster's Revolt, 1328-29’. Matt will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Matt’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Matt’s paper in PDF format or Word format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 16 February 2021. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

On 19 January 2021 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Matthew Roberts (Sheffield Hallam University). Matthew will be answering questions on his paper ‘Romantic Memory? Forgetting, Remembering and Feeling in the Chartist Pantheon of Heroes, c.1790–1840’. Matthew will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Matthew’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Matthew’s paper in PDF format or Word format (Images in separate Word file) (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 19 January 2020. We acknowledge that work commitments, caring responsibilities and time zones may make attendance at the seminar difficult. If you find that you can only attend part of the session, please contact the convenors and we will do our best to prioritise your involvement. Likewise, if you find that you are unable to attend you can submit a question to seminar@histparl.ac.uk and the convenors will put you in touch with the speaker.

On 1 December 2020 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Liam Liburd (King’s College London). Liam will be answering questions on his paper ‘Powell’s predecessors: the British radical right and opposition to Commonwealth immigration in Britain, 1952-1967’. Liam will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Liam’s paper via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Liam’s paper in PDF format or Word format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 1 December 2020. If you require any further information, or are unable to attend and would like to submit a question for Liam please contact seminar@histparl.ac.uk

On 17 November 2020 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Dr Emma Peplow and Dr Priscila Pivatto (History of Parliament Trust). Emma and Priscila will be answering questions on their paper ‘A prep school, 'Dracula's castle', or where they belonged? First impressions of Westminster from the History of Parliament's oral history project’. Emma and Priscila will provide a brief summary of their paper before a question and answer session. You can access Emma and Priscila’s paper and blog via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Emma and Priscila’s paper in PDF format or Word format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

You can read Emma and Priscila’s blog on the History of Parliament blog from 10 November 2020

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 17 November 2020. If you require any further information, or are unable to attend and would like to submit a question for Emma and Priscila please contact seminar@histparl.ac.uk

 

On 3 November 2020 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Michael Taylor, the author of The Interest: How the British Establishment Resisted the Abolition of Slavery (2020). Michael will be answering questions on his paper ‘The West India Interest and Colonial Slavery in Parliament, 1823-33’. Michael will provide a brief summary of his paper before a question and answer session. You can access Michael’s paper and blog via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Michael Taylor’s paper in PDF format or Word format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

You can read Michael Taylor’s blog on the History of Parliament blog from 27 October 2020

 

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 3 November 2020. If you require any further information, or are unable to attend and would like to submit a question for Michael please contact seminar@histparl.ac.uk

IHR Parliaments, Politics and People seminar: Zoom Q&A with Eilish Gregory

On 20 October 2020 the IHR Parliament, Politics and People seminar will be a hosting a virtual seminar via Zoom with Eilish Gregory (University of Reading). Eilish will be answering questions on her paper ‘Catholic Forfeitures during the English Revolution: Parliament and the Role of Sequestration Agents’. Eilish will provide a brief summary of her paper before a question and answer session. You can access Eilish’s paper and blog via the links below.

 

To receive Zoom details for the seminar you will need to sign up via the IHR event page (press ‘Book Now’)

 

You can read Eilish Gregory’s paper in PDF format or Word format (right click ‘save file as’)

 

You can read Eilish Gregory’s blog on the History of Parliament blog from 13 October 2020

The seminar will take place on Zoom at 17:15 on 20 October 2020. If you require any further information, or are unable to attend and would like to submit a question for Eilish please contact seminar@histparl.ac.uk

The German Historical Institute London and the History of Parliament Trust invite you to an online workshop on 30 October that will tackle the issues of law and consent in the study of medieval Britain. It brings together medievalists from different periods (Early to Late Middle Ages) and research contexts (England and Germany) to reach a more nuanced understanding of consent. The case studies will come from a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from Anglo-Saxon synods to the medieval parliament.

Register via Eventbrite here.

The provisional programme is available here.

Please direct all inquiries to Connie Jeffrey at the History of Parliament Trust: cjeffery@histparl.ac.uk

This is an online event that will take place via the Zoom video conferencing platform. Access details will be emailed to participants nearer to the event.

Join the History of Parliament and the British Library on Tuesday 27 October at 18:00 for an online event to celebrate the publication of 'The Political Lives of Postwar British MPs: an oral history of Parliament', a volume based on the Trust’s ground breaking oral history project.

The Political Lives of Postwar British MPs, authored by the project’s coordinators Dr Emma Peplow and Dr Priscila Pivatto, delves deeply into a unique archive of nearly 200 interviews with former MPs to immerse the reader in what political life at Westminster was really like between the 1950s and early 2000s.

During the event Emma and Priscila will be in conversation with Dr Rob Perks, Lead Curator of Oral History at the British Library about the book and the ongoing project, which is archived at the British Library Sounds Archive. Their conversation will be followed by an audience Q&A.

Register for free here.

Please direct any queries to Connie Jeffery.