OTTLEY, Sir Richard (1626-70), of Pitchford Hall, Salop.

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Constituency

Dates

1661 - 10 Aug. 1670

Family and Education

b. 5 Aug. 1626, 1st s. of Sir Francis Ottley of Pitchford by Lucy, da. of Thomas Edwards of The College, Shrewsbury, wid. of Thomas Pope of Shrewsbury. educ. Shrewsbury 1638; G. Inn 1647. m. c. Jan. 1649, Lady Lettice Ridgeway, da. of Robert, 2nd Earl of Londonderry [I], 6s. (2 d.v.p.) 1da. suc. fa. 1649; kntd. 21 June 1660.1

Offices Held

Capt. (royalist) 1642-5.

J.p. Salop. Mar. 1660-d., dep. lt. July 1660-d., commr. for assessment Aug. 1660-9, capt. of militia horse Oct. 1660-d., jt. receiver of hearth-tax 1662-7, commr. for oyer and terminer 1662, corporations 1662-3, loyal and indigent officers 1662, jt. farmer of excise 1663-d.2

Gent. of privy chamber June 1660-d.3

Biography

Ottley was descended from Thomas Ottley, merchant of the staple and alderman of Shrewsbury, who purchased Pitchford in 1473. A member of the family had represented Bridgnorth under Elizabeth. In the first Civil War, Ottley’s father was made a commissioner of array by Charles I, and distinguished himself in the royalist cause as governor of Shrewsbury 1643-4. Ottley served under his father in the Shrewsbury garrison, and surrendered with him in February 1645. Father and son compounded together under the Bridgnorth articles on a fine of £1,860, reduced to £1,200 in consideration of a £4,000 debt. In March 1650 after his father’s death, Ottley took the oath to the Commonwealth, obtained passes from the Shropshire and Staffordshire county committees in order to settle his financial affairs, and discharged the estate on payment of £169 to the committee for the advance of money.4

In March 1660 Ottley was sent a commission from Charles II in Brussels to raise militia forces in Shropshire. He went to greet the King on his arrival in England, reporting to his mother on 29 May:

I praise God we are safe come to town, and his Majesty with his two brothers, the Duke of York and the Duke of Gloucester, are now at Whitehall.