Dunheved

Borough

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Background Information

No names known for 1510-23

Elections

DateCandidate
1529SIR EDWARD RYNGELEY
 JOHN RASTELL
1536(not known)
1539(not known)
1542(not known)
1545WILLIAM CORDELL
 ROBERT TAVERNER
1547WILLIAM CAVELL 1
 NICHOLAS CARMINOWE 2
1553 (Mar.)WILLIAM LEY alias KEMPTHORN3
 ?JOHN LEY alias KEMPTHORN I4
1553 (Oct.)ROBERT MONSON
 JOHN LEY alias KEMPTHORN I
1554 (Apr.)JOHN LEY alias KEMPTHORN I
 ARTHUR WELCHE
1554 (Nov.)WILLIAM BENDLOWES
 JOHN LEY alias KEMPTHORN I
1555RICHARD GRENVILLE II
 JOHN LEY alias KEMPTHORN II
1558ROBERT MONSON
 JOHN HAYDON

Main Article

In the later middle ages the name Launceston was used, sometimes confusingly, to cover three separate townships, Launceston St. Stephen, Dunheved and Newport. The most important of these, Dunheved, was founded soon after the Conquest, and as head of the honor of Launceston became the judicial headquarters of Cornwall with the county gaol in the castle. But its position, so near the border with Devon, made it highly inconvenient of access, and by the early 16th century Lostwithiel had largely superseded it. A few county courts a year were still held at Launceston castle, but between 1504 and 1538 only one parliamentary election for the shire is known to have taken place there, in January 1545. The town was one of eight given sanctuary status under the Act of 1540 (32 Hen. VIII, c.12).5

A stannary town and a duchy of Cornwall borough which in 1538-9 paid £8 as fee-farm to the duchy, Dunheved had received a charter from Richard, Earl of Cornwall, in the first half of the 13th century, and later royal charters were confirmed in 1515, 1543 and 1547. With the help of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, it was formally incorporated as Dunheved, otherwise Launceston, in 1556, the first Cornish borough to receive the privilege. By this grant, which presumably confirmed the existing arrangements, the governing body was to consist of a mayor and eight aldermen; there was an indefinite number of freemen who elected the mayor from two aldermen nominated by the governing body; and the aldermen could fill vacancies in their numbers from the freemen. Several lesser officials assisted in the administration of the town: there was a recorder, by 1543 Sir John Arundell, and several lawyers were retained as counsel. Borough accounts for the period are extant.6

Dunheved is first known to have returned to Parliament in 1295, and the Marian charter stated that Members were to be elected by the mayor and commonalty at the charges and costs of the borough. In practice the freemen probably carried out the election, although the governing body may have exercised considerable influence. Elections were held in the guildhall and only once during the period were those at Dunheved and Newport iuxta Launceston held on the same day, in September 1545, and then nine months after the shire election in the castle. Five Latin indentures of election survive; the one for October 1554 is headed ‘Launceston alias Dunheved’, but the others have only ‘Dunheved’. The contracting parties are the sheriff of Cornwall and the (named) mayor and burgesses or mayor and communitas (community or commonalty).