BOUCHERETT, Ayscoghe (1755-1815), of Willingham and Stallingborough, Lincs.

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1790-1820, ed. R. Thorne, 1986
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Constituency

Dates

1796 - 13 July 1803

Family and Education

b. 16 Apr. 1755. o.s. of Ayscoghe Boucherett of Willingham and Stallingborough by w. Mary née White.1 educ. Queens’, Camb. 1773. m. 17 Mar. 1789, Emilia, da. of Charles Crockatt, London merchant, of Luxborough Hall, Essex, 1s. 3da. suc. fa. 1789.

Offices Held

High steward, Grimsby 1794-d.; sheriff, Lincs. 1795-6.

Capt. Market Raisin yeomanry 1798; lt.-col. commdt. N. Lincs. yeomanry 1814-d.

Biography

Boucherett came of a London mercantile family of French origin which invested in Lincolnshire estates in the 17th century and acquired the Ayscoghe estate there by marriage. His mother-in-law’s remarriage to the financier John Julius Angerstein gave him contacts with merchant entrepreneurs and in 1795 he was in the forefront of a scheme to reopen the silt-clogged harbour of Grimsby, of which borough he had been elected high steward the year before. He was elected chairman of the company authorized by statute to carry it out (14 May 1796).2 Meanwhile, Lord Yarborough, the borough’s electoral patron, had been induced by Boucherett to sponsor him as a candidate at the next election, describing him to the Duke of Portland as ‘a friend and neighbour of mine’ and ‘really a friend to the present administration’, 29 Dec. 1795.3 He had reconciled Yarborough and George Tennyson*, leader of the rival faction at Grimsby.

Boucherett was an unobtrusive Member. On 15 Dec. 1796, having just subscribed £5,000 to the loyalty loan, he obtained a month’s leave because of a relative’s illness. Portland, on learning from him that his attendance would involve ‘serious inconvenience or risk’, excused him, 10 Mar. 1797, there being no ‘very pressing call upon our friends’ and wished he might ‘at a future period of the session’, if applied to, ‘travel without inconvenience or danger’.4 He joined the minority for Bankes’s amendment critical of the sending of the militia to Ireland to suppress rebellion, 19 June 1798. He was one of those ‘not in the habit of voting with the opposition’ who did so on the failure of the Ferrol expedition, 19 Feb. 1801.5 Two weeks later he obtained leave of absence for the Lincoln assizes. He had served the Grimsby Haven Company, who found the £30,000 they had been authorized to raise for their purposes inadequate, by bringing in a bill to extend their resources in 1799. But by 1801 the affairs of the company were deteriorating and Boucherett’s own finances with them.6 He survived a contest in 1802, only to resign a year later to make way for Yarborough’s heir. He had vote