WYNDHAM, Sir Edward, 2nd Bt. (c.1667-95), of Orchard Wyndham, Som.

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Constituency

Dates

1690 - June 1695

Family and Education

b. c.1667, 1667, 4th but o. surv. s. of (Sir) William Wyndham, 1st Bt. m. lic. 14 June 1687, aged 20 (with £6,000), Catharine da. of (Sir) William Leveson Gower, 4th Bt., of Trentham, Staffs., 1s. 1da. suc. fa. 29 Oct. 1683.

Offices Held

Dep. lt. Som. 1683-7, 1691-d., j.p. 1685-Feb. 1688, Oct. 1688-d., commr. for rebels’ estates 1686, assessment. Som. 1689-90, Wilts. 1690.1

Biography

Wyndham inherited an income of over £4,000 a year, and was first returned for Ilchester under age as a Tory at the general election of 1685. In James II’s Parliament he was appointed only to the committees on the bills to continue expiring laws and to encourage woollen manufactures. He obtained a pass to his home in Somerset on 29 June, but took no known part in the repression of Monmouth’s rebellion. An opponent of the King’s religious policy, he was removed from the lieutenancy, and gave the same negative replies as (Sir) Edward Phelips II on the repeal of the Test Act and Penal Laws. It was reported in April 1688 that he had spent £10 on a ‘randy’ in his constituency when the charter was under attack. Sunderland’s correspondent was confident that this would not affect the chances of the Whig collaborators who were standing as court candidates, but he defeated them at the general election of 1689. In the Convention he voted to agree with the Lords that the throne was not vacant. Again inactive, he may have been added to the committee to examine prisoners of state on 20 Mar., and he was appointed to the committee of elections and privileges for the second session. Re-elected as a Tory in 1690, he was buried at St. Decuman’s on 29 June 1695. He was the father of the Jacobite leader, Sir William Wyndham, who sat for the county from 1710 till his death thirty years later.2