GORING, Henry I (1622-1702), of Highden, Washington, Suss.

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Constituency

Dates

1660
Mar. 1679
1685

Family and Education

b. 1 May 1622, o.s. of Henry Goring of Highden by Mary, da. of Sir Thomas Eversfield of Denne Park, Horsham. m. 2 May 1642, Frances, da. of Sir Edward Bishopp, 2nd Bt., of Parham, 4s. (3 d.v.p.), 3da. suc. fa. 1655, Sir James Bowyer as 2nd Bt. Feb. 1680.1

Offices Held

J.p. Suss. July 1660-July 1688, Sept. 1688-9, dep. lt. Aug. 1660-May 1688, commr. for assessment Aug. 1660-80, 1689, sewers, W. Suss. Oct. 1660, oyer and terminer, Home circuit 1661, loyal and indigent officers, Suss. 1662, recusants 1675; common councilman, Chichester 1685-Oct. 1688.2

Biography

Goring came from a cadet branch of the Burton family. His father, who was MP for Arundel in the Short Parliament, was apparently neutral in the Civil War, serving on the commission of the peace from 1646 to 1650. Goring’s own case is more dubious; he was probably the ‘Henry Goring, gent.’ captured by Sir William Waller I at the surrender of Arundel Castle in 1644. No composition proceedings followed, and the county committee must have accepted that he was merely a visitor to the garrison, where his wife and mother-in-law had been living. Nevertheless, his sympathies were royalist, though he was, with good reason, ‘very wary and shy’ of Cavalier plotting during the Interregnum. At the Restoration he was nominated to the proposed order of the Royal Oak, with an income of £2,000 p.a.3

At the general election of 1660 Goring was returned for Steyning, four miles south-east of Highden, as well as for the county. An inactive Member, he was appointed only to the committee of elections and privileges and to that for the attainder bill, but doubtless supported the Government. He had to step down to the borough in 1661, and was again inactive in the Cavalier Parliament, serving on 46 committees at most. He was named to the committee for the five mile bill in the Oxford session. Goring was a firm friend to an extruded minister who kept a school in his former parish of Billingshurst, although later William Penn the Quaker complained that he and John Alford made his life in Sussex ‘uneasy’. He made default in attendance in 1666 and again in 1671, though noted as a supporter of Ormonde and listed by Sir Thomas Osborne among the independent Members who had usually voted for supply. From 1673 there is the possibility of confusion with his son, but he was probably appointed to the committee to consider the dispute between Sir Thomas Byde and the board of green cloth on 3 Feb. 1674 and to the committee on illegal exactions six days later. He was marked with a query on the list of government supporters drawn up by Sir Richard Wiseman but he was reckoned