Hastings

Borough

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Background Information

Right of Election:

in the resident freemen paying scot and lot

Number of voters:

67 in 1689

Elections

DateCandidateVotes
c. Apr. 1660DENNY ASHBURNHAM 
 NICHOLAS DELVES 
6 May 1661EDMUND WALLER I 
 DENNY ASHBURNHAM 
11 Feb. 1679SIR ROBERT PARKER, Bt. 
 JOHN ASHBURNHAM II 
8 Oct. 1679JOHN ASHBURNHAM II 
 SIR ROBERT PARKER, Bt. 
10 Mar. 1681SIR ROBERT PARKER, Bt. 
 THOMAS MUN 
26 Mar. 1685(SIR) DENNY ASHBURNHAM 
 JOHN ASHBURNHAM II 
14 Jan. 1689JOHN ASHBURNHAM II 
 THOMAS MUN 
9 Aug. 1689JOHN BEAUMONT vice Ashburnham, called to the Upper House35
 Peter Gott32

Main Article

Hastings returned an Ashburnham at every general election in the period except 1681. In 1660 the corporation politely rejected the Admiralty candidate, the Hon. Edward Montagu, in favour of Denny Ashburnham, head of a cadet branch of the family, and Nicholas Delves, a London merchant of local origin who was the mayor’s brother. In 1661 Ashburnham was re-elected with Edmund Waller, the lord warden’s nominee. Neither stood for the Exclusion Parliaments. In both elections of 1679 the port returned two local gentlemen, probably of opposite political views. John Ashburnham, the head of the family, had certainly inherited a tradition of loyalty, while Sir Robert Parker was probably a cautious exclusionist. In 1681 Ashburnham lost his seat to Thomas Mun, of the country party, who had formerly owned property in the neighbourhood. All three elections were said to be ‘with the unanimous assent and consent’ of the corporation and commonalty. But the former, at least, soon repented their rashness. In October 1683 they assured John Strode II, the governor of Dover Castle, that they ‘all, nem. con., readily and gladly allowed of the authority of the lord warden’ to nominate one of their Members, adding that ‘there is not one dissenter in this whole body, and scarce any, or few, within all our jurisdiction’. A loyal address followed congratulating James II on his accession, and in the general election of 1685 Sir Denny Ashburnham, who had become an excise commissioner, was duly elected as government nominee, while his cousin John sat on the family interest. Nevertheless Hastings lost its charter. Under the replacement, which was issued in October, Sir Denny Ashburnham was nominated mayor and S