Dover

Borough

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603, ed. P.W. Hasler, 1981
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Elections

DateCandidate
13 Jan. 1559THOMAS WARREN
 JOHN ROBINS
1562/3JOHN ROBINS
 THOMAS WARREN
1571THOMAS ANDREWS II
 JOHN PINCHON
1572THOMAS ANDREWS II
 THOMAS WARREN
[?14] Nov. 1584RICHARD BARREY
 JOHN MOORE II
1586RICHARD BARREY
 JOHN MOORE II
1588THOMAS FANE
 EDWARD STEPHENS
1593THOMAS FANE
 THOMAS ELWOOD
22 Oct. 1597THOMAS FANE
 WILLIAM LEONARD
1601GEORGE FANE
 GEORGE NEWMAN

Main Article

Dover was the most important of the Cinque Ports and, by the beginning of Elizabeth’s reign, had already enjoyed several centuries of strong and independent local government. Parliamentary elections were conducted in the common assemblies, consisting of mayor, jurats, common council and freemen.

The 1559 Members were two townsmen, one of whom, Thomas Warren, had already sat at least twice. The same men were re-elected in 1563, the mayor’s name being placed above Warren’s on the return. The warden intervened for the first time in 1571 when John Pinchon, identified as an Essex landowner, was returned with the mayor, whose name again appears in the superior position. On this occasion it appears that the warden gave his nomination to a friend at court. In 1572 the two townsmen Andrews and Warren were again returned, and on 7 Sept. 1579 the common assembly resolved that none but jurats should in future be elected to Parliament. However, by the time of the next election the warden had drummed up some support from the Privy Council. He wrote to the town asserting that the Council had allow