Huntingdonshire

County

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Elections

DateCandidate
1510JOHN WYNDE 1
 JOHN TAYLARD 2
1512(not known)
1515(not known)
1523(not known)
1529NICHOLAS HARVEY
 (aft. 5 Aug. 1532 not known)
 LAWRENCE TAYLARD
1536(not known)
1539RICHARD CROMWELL alias WILLIAMS3
 OLIVER LEDER 4
1542(SIR) RICHARD CROMWELL alias WILLIAMS
 ROBERT AP RICE
1545(not known)
1547(SIR) JOHN BAKER I
 ROBERT AP RICE
1553 (Mar.)(not known)
 THOMAS AUDLEY II
1553 (Oct.)(SIR) LAWRENCE TAYLARD
 OLIVER LEDER
1554 (Apr.)SIR ROBERT TYRWHITT I
 THOMAS COTTON
1554 (Nov.)WILLIAM LAWRENCE II
 HENRY MANNOCK
1555THOMAS MARIA WINGFIELD
 WILLIAM MALLORY
1558THOMAS COTTON
 WILLIAM LAWRENCE II

Main Article

Indentures of election for Huntingdonshire survive for all Parliaments from 1542 save those of 1545 and 1558: they are in Latin and several are in poor condition. The elections were held at Huntingdon castle and the indentures are in the usual form between the sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire and named electors varying in number between 13 and 29. In January and September 1553 Simon Throckmorton headed the list of electors: on the first occasion his patron Sir Robert Tyrwhitt may have been returned as senior knight but all that remains on a damaged indenture is the suffix ‘knight’. Tyrwhitt himself was at Huntingdon castle for the election to the Parliament of 1555, the only occasion on which a knight appears as an elector: he heads a list of four esquires, six gentlemen and 18 yeomen, and the senior knight elected was his stepson Thomas Maria Wingfield. Two Huntingdon Members also appear among the shire electors, in 1547 Philip Clampe and in the spring of 1554 Clampe and William Horwood.5

Of the 15 knights known to have been returned during the period only Sir John Baker was a stranger to the county. Robert ap Rice, Thomas Audley, Richard Cromwell alias Williams, Henry Mannock and Tyrwhitt were recent arrivals who by the time of their election had established themselves in local administration; William Lawrence’s family had been settled there for only one generation. In being elected John and Lawrence Taylard were continuing a family tradition which as far as is known was not shared by their fellows. Although no single family predominated, at least four of the knights N